Blog - coffee from every angle : Health, human capital, social measures and coffee producers / Café Liégeois Canada


Coffee: a tool promoting discussion and well-being

You greet your customer and offer them a coffee. A gesture that has become commonplace but that still holds so much importance. What is the impact, whether on the ground, from the salesperson to the customer, or in-house between work colleagues? Café Liegeois is unveiling the secret of and benefits brought by the Robusto or Arabica espresso we receive when asked the famous question, “Would you like a coffee?". 

During your appointment with your hairdresser, bank manager or lawyer, you are usually going to be asked if you want a coffee. In reality this seemingly trivial question adds real value. This well-known hot black drink is a symbol of warmth from your host. So much so that coffee, the second most popular drink in the world, establishes a warm atmosphere and makes discussions easier.

Black gold has become just as important in the customer experience as the host’s smile. This small gesture of offering someone a coffee may eventually have an influence on the satisfaction questionnaire. If you take the example of an important and formal negotiation meeting between a client and his bank manager, coffee plays an important and interesting role. During more abrupt discussions on often disagreeable matters, it would seem that sipping coffee together helps defuse the atmosphere from the start. An espresso prepared at the hands of the agency’s contact person also gives the impression that you are a premium customer. Negotiations therefore get off on a better footing and the bank manager’s role appears less daunting.

It is like this in many different domains and professions, so it comes as no surprise that we increasingly see coffee being offered to welcome visitors. Today, several studies have proved that customers are expecting “a real customer experience” from the company and not just a service or direct sale. The important-yet-simple role coffee plays is all the more valued when your hosthas taken the trouble to hand the cup to you personally. This is the first impression that the customer takes away from the meeting. A self-service drinks machine will no longer cut it and an espresso gives you thatfeeling of being valued. 

In-house, what positive effects does coffee conjure up? Discussion, team spirit, personal and professional subjects, meetings and decompartmentalization. More than a chance for a break, employees see in coffee a tool that motivates them and opens up communication. Company news is often a hot topic, so coffee is always a good way to strengthen team spirit. Add to this the quality of the coffee: the choice a company makes about this detail will have a direct influence on the recognition, value and the attention it places on its employees’ well-being. These feelings incite personal investment, better performance and a reduction in stress. Lastly, coffee breaks are not only about psychological benefits. Drinking coffee also optimises physical and intellectual capacity and boosts concentration and memory.

Whatever the situation (formal, informal, personal, etc.), coffee is a great tool in promoting well-being and communication. So wait no longer to share in that Liegeois moment!

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The Biggest Coffee Drinkers in History

It is no surprise that at Café Liégeois we are full-out coffee addicts. All we do is think about coffee, talk about coffee, make coffee and, of course, drink coffee. For me, I have a Tradition black coffee and two Magnifico espressos to get the day going. And when I need a pick-me-up after lunch, I often go for a single Kivu espresso. That’s four coffees per day!

I used to be a bit weary of my coffee consumption, but after stumbling upon some coffee history facts, I realized that I am quite moderate in comparison to some of history’s greatest celebrities. Philosophers, writers, politicians and even musicians have depended on this beverage to create the work that has since made them a legacy. Who knows, maybe the world wouldn’t be the same as it is today without the help of a few (dozen) coffees.

 

From composers to politicians, here is a short list of some of the biggest coffee drinkers of the past five hundred years:

 

Ludwig Van Beethoven

This famous composer was just as meticulous with the creation of his music as he was with the brewing of his coffee. It has been said that Beethoven would count out exactly 60 coffee beans to make his morning cup of coffee. According to him, this was the perfect dosage to make an exceptional cup.

 

Voltaire

“If there was no Coffee, it would be necessary to invent it”, am I right? French writer Voltaire is known to be one of the largest coffee drinkers of all time. He is rumoured to have drank forty to fifty coffees mixed with chocolate per day. Though many feared this alarming amount would kill him, Voltaire lived into his mid eighties.

 

Johann Sebastian Bach

It wasn’t for nothing that the composer created a mini opera based on coffee! The Coffee Cantana is a short story about a father who demands his coffee-addicted daughter to give up the drink in order to get married. Luckily for her, there were plenty of coffee-crazed suitors that would agree to marry her!

 

Teddy Roosevelt

 For those curious to know where the start of the Venti sized coffees came from, it all leads back to former President Roosevelt. The president would drink a full gallon of coffee everyday. Even his son commented on his father’s obsession, noting that his cup was “more in the nature of a bathtub”.

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An Authentic Coffee In The Heart of Central America

An Authentic Coffee In The Heart of Central America

In Central America, Honduras is at the center of cultivating a high quality coffee known for its intense and rich aromas. Thanks to the country's dry and wet seasons, Honduras has become an optimal destination for coffee producers.

At Café Liégeois Canada, we are proud to offer our famous Ital’Bar, a blend of Arabica and Robusta from Honduras.

The Beginning of a Coffee Culture 

The first coffee grains were brought over to Honduras and Costa Rica from the Palestinians who ventured to the West and landed in Olancho in the 19th century. However, it was not until 1950 that the government decided to benefit from this coffee culture and turn it into an important source of income for the country's economy.

Today, over 100,000 families are positively impacted by the coffee industry in Honduras. About 3.9 million bags of coffee, weighing 60kg each, are exported every year from the 6 major producing regions : Copan, Opalac, Montecillos, Agalta, Comayagua et El Paraiso.

The Crops

The coffee crops can be found at an altitude of 1000 metres above sea level, giving this coffee its reputation of high quality. Indeed, the acidity level of the coffee beans is positively correlated with the altitude at which it is grown. In addition, the crops are maintained and farmed respectfully to respect the environment.

Café Liégeois is proud to sell the Ital'Bar from Honduras: a well-rounded coffee filled of flavourful notes and accompanied by sustained Italian roasting which strengthens the intensity of this coffee.

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